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Author: John Updike   Illustrator: Trina Schart Hyman   Narrator: John Updike

Available Discounts

Happy19
    ISBN: 9781591129318
    Release Date: 06/30/2004
    Grades: K - 4
    Reading Level: 3.6
    Length:  12 Min 46 Sec

    Audio File
    Child's Calendar 1 PB/1 CD
    ISBN: 9781591129318
    $19.95
    Qty:
    Child's Calendar 4 PB/1 CD
    ISBN: 9781591129332
    $44.95
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    Child's Calendar 1 HC/1 CD
    ISBN: 9781591129325
    $29.95
    Qty:
    Child's Calendar CD
    ISBN: 9781591129301
    $12.95
    Qty:

    Description 

    "...This read-along is a richly sensory experience.... sound effects of chirping birds, tromping feet, lowing cows, whirring insects, exploding fireworks, pounding surf, buzzing bees, barking dogs, honking geese, and tolling bells create their own aural metaphors that echo the poet's verse and clearly reflect the seasons. "-Booklist

    Reviews

    Review by: AudioFile Magazine - June 15, 2005
    "Updike’s 12 poems celebrate the changing seasons with images that might catch a child’s eye. His verses, some of which are very lovely, focus on changes in the natural world (from snow to mud to crocuses) and on celebrations that accompany these changes (Christmas, Valentine's, Fourth of July). Each verse ends with a sound image that connects to the month’s poem (such as the sound of fireworks or baseball heard on TV). Updike’s presentation is earnest. While he sometimes overemphasizes line breaks in his poems, he has a kind voice and reads carefully, allowing time for children to enjoy the lovely gem-like illustrations by Trina Schart Hyman."
    Review by: Booklist Magazine - November 15, 2004
    "This read-along is a richly sensory experience. Set against appropriate musical selections. Updike's poems present vignettes of a family enjoying rituals throughout the year. Trina Schart Hyman's delightfully detailed watercolor illustrations portray a biracial family. Included sound effects of chirping birds, tromping feet, lowing cows, whirring insects, exploding fireworks, pounding surf, buzzing bees, barking dogs, honking geese, and tolling bells create their own aural metaphors that echo the poet's verse and clearly reflect the seasons. Updike's reading, with a definite pause at the end of each line, gives listeners a sense of how he wants his poem to sound"